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What does hyperbaric oxygen therapy do?

Hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) is a medical treatment that involves breathing 100% oxygen while inside a pressurized chamber. It is used to treat a variety of conditions, including decompression sickness, carbon monoxide poisoning, and wound healing.

During HBOT, a patient is placed in a specialized chamber that is pressurized to a level higher than normal atmospheric pressure. This increase in pressure allows the body to absorb more oxygen, which can be beneficial for a variety of medical conditions.

One of the primary uses of HBOT is for the treatment of decompression sickness, also known as "the bends." Decompression sickness occurs when a person ascends too quickly from deep water, causing dissolved gases to come out of solution and form bubbles in the bloodstream. These bubbles can block blood flow and cause tissue damage, leading to symptoms such as joint pain, skin rash, and shortness of breath. HBOT can help to dissolve these bubbles and improve blood flow, reducing the severity of symptoms.


HBOT is also used to treat carbon monoxide poisoning, which occurs when carbon monoxide gas is inhaled. Carbon monoxide is a poisonous gas that can replace oxygen in the bloodstream, leading to symptoms such as headache, dizziness, and weakness. HBOT can help to remove carbon monoxide from the bloodstream and restore oxygen levels, improving symptoms and reducing the risk of long-term complications.

In addition to its use in the treatment of decompression sickness and carbon monoxide poisoning, HBOT is also used to promote wound healing. When a wound is not receiving enough oxygen, it can take longer to heal and may be more prone to infection. HBOT can increase the amount of oxygen available to the wound, helping to speed up the healing process and reduce the risk of infection.



HBOT is also being studied for its potential benefits in the treatment of other medical conditions, including stroke, brain injury, and radiation injuries. Some studies have suggested that HBOT may be able to improve brain function and reduce the risk of complications in these cases. However, more research is needed to fully understand the effects of HBOT in these situations and determine its effectiveness as a treatment option.


HBOT is generally considered to be a safe and effective treatment option, but there are some potential risks and side effects to be aware of. These may include ear and sinus pain, claustrophobia.


It is often used to optimize healing processes for general wellness, infected wounds or physical therapy for joint pain. The use of HBOT is regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and is typically only available at specialized centers such as Cryo Body Works in Austin Texas or hospitals. It does require a prescription. Patients interested in HBOT should discuss the potential risks and benefits with a healthcare provider and ensure that the treatment is being administered by a trained and certified professional.


Overall, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is a promising medical treatment that can be used to treat a variety of conditions, including decompression sickness, carbon monoxide poisoning, and wound healing. While it is generally considered safe, it is important to discuss the potential risks and benefits with a healthcare provider before starting treatment. Further research is needed to fully understand the potential uses and effects of HBOT, and to determine its effectiveness as a treatment option for a wider range of medical conditions.


If you still have questions or are you curious enough to book your first appointment? Give us a call or stop in anytime we’re open (hours and location are posted below) and our friendly, well-informed staff can answer your questions and advise you on making your first appointment. You can also email us at: info@cryobodyworks.com


We look forward to helping you!

Cryo Body Works

(512) 522 0221

3501 Hyridge Dr

Austin, TX 78759


Mon - Fri 10AM – 7PM


Sat 11AM - 5PM


Sun 12PM - 4PM

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